Wednesday, 16 April 2014

Jobs ads are often discriminatory, ombudsman says

ČTK |
16 June 2011

Brno, June 15 (CTK) - Czech employers often discriminate against the job seekers as evidenced by the fact that every sixth job advertisement is discriminatory, ombudsman Pavel Varvarovsky told journalists yesterday.

The name of a profession in the masculine gender does not pose any problem as this is used in Czech for both sexes, Varvarovsky said.

On the other hand, it can be considered a discrimination against males if an employer seeks a "prodavacka" or "kadernice" (female shop assistant or female hairdresser), he added.

The ombudsman's team examined 12,000 job ads on one of the work portals on April 1-7.

There is a frequent indirect discrimination if an employee wants to hire a person for a young collective.

"One can indirectly infer that since there is a young collective, an older job seeker would hardly be welcomed as he would be a problem in the young collective," Lucie Obrovska, from the Ombudsman's Office, said.

The ombudsman considers discriminatory also the situation in which a firm wants to hire a person with a clean criminal record such as manual workers for construction or gardening works.

Lawyer Michal Cermak, from the Ombudsman's Office, said the failure to pay alimonies was the most frequent reason for a prison sentence in the Czech Republic.

If the situation is to be remedied, such people should find jobs as soon as they are released from prison, Cermak said.

If a clean criminal record is demanded even for unskilled manual jobs, they will never repay the alimonies, he added.

The demand for inordinately long working practice may discriminate against certain groups, too, Cermak said.

He said the survey had come across some advertisers demanding 15 or 20 years of practice. If this is coupled with the demand of university education, women and men who spent some time with children at parental leave can also be eliminated, Cermak said.

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