Monday, 24 September 2018

Some presidential candidates unveil their programmes

ČTK |
11 January 2018

Prague, Jan 10 (CTK) - Some candidates for Czech president have unveiled their election programmes to voters at their webpages, mostly outlining their visions of the Czech Republic and the qualities the president should have.

They only rarely give direct promises to voters.

They often reject the EU redistribution quotas for refugees and uncontrolled migration, stressing the protection of EU borders and national interests.

The candidates only marginally deal with economic questions, especially in connection with the introduction of the euro and support for Czech exports.

President Milos Zeman, who seeks re-election, has not offered any visions, promises or programme, arguing that he does not want to wage any campaign. His election web offers the information and photographs from his life and instructions with which to fill in the petition in his support.

Former Science Academy chairman Jiri Drahos offers his visions of the Czech Republic's further orientation. He speaks about a modern state, advocating the membership of the EU and NATO and a more efficient control of the EU outer border and rejecting the quotas. He promises that as the president he would execute the post positively and will not warp the constitution.

Businessman and lyricist Michal Horacek already introduced his programme at the beginning of his candidacy. He promises to represent the Czech Republic in a dignified way, not to cultivate any special relationship with any party, to insist on security at home and to renew pride and self-confidence. Horacek rejects the refugee quotas, but also says he considers migration an opportunity to gain hard-working and educated people. He pledges to support the export of Czech products. His programme deals with education, the military and modern technologies.

Former Civic Democrat (ODS) chairman and prime minister Mirek Topolanek promises to be a strong and energetic president protecting people and Czech interests. He says he wants to "bury the ditches" and contribute to a better atmosphere in society. If the EU does not protect its border, the Czech Republic should protect its own one. Topolanek warns of the "political Islam," advocates a strong military within NATO and pledges to face attacks on the freedom of speech.

Activist and doctor Marek Hilser says he runs as he wants to bring new energy to the post and to return its original sense to it, which means serving the people. He says he would like to highlight the topics of education, science and research, laying emphasis on the health system. Hilser promises to work on a strategic vision of support for education and stabilisation and development of the health care.

Former ambassador to France Pavel Fischer says as the president he wants to interconnect the government, parliament and other state institutions. He promises to insist on security and support the disadvantaged and marginalised citizens. As the head of state, he would have the Czech voice in the EU be heard more.

Skoda Auto former board chairman Vladimir Kulhanek says he wants to be a president of whom people will be proud. Instead of a programme, he promises his visions and priorities. He stresses his respect for workers, craftsmen and farmers. He says he will not be opposed to the euro.

Defence and Security Industry Association President Jiri Hynek presents himself as a strong president for hard times. The main pillars of his candidacy are the protection of the Czech national interest, the role of the supreme commander of the armed forces and advocacy of the interests of the Czech industry.

Musician and producer Petr Hannig sums up his election priorities in four brief points. He promises to approach the work with common sense and heart. Patriotism must not be denounced and no one can dictate anything to Czech citizens from outside, he says. He stressed that since globally prominent personalities have arisen from the Czech nation, Czechs should be proud.

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