Wednesday, 15 August 2018

Politics

Fresh air

The Economist |
18 June 2010

After years of sleaze and stagnation central European politics is livening up. In April the centre-right gained a thumping majority in Hungary. At the end of May Czech voters, spurred by an anti-corruption campaign, shunned the two main parties for newcomers. And now Slovaks have evicted the country's most effective politician, the populist and nationalist prime minister Robert Fico, in favour of a bunch of free-market parties preaching lean government and ethnic harmony.

Upcoming ODS congress might stall govt negotiations

Radio Prague |
15 June 2010

Three weeks after general elections, three centre-right parties are still holding talks on forming a coalition government. On Friday, the leader of the strongest party, the Civic Democrats, is set to inform President Václav Klaus on the progress made so for, and might even leave those talks as prime minister designate. But the Civic Democrats are holding a crucial congress over the weekend that could change everything.

Roadblocks to watch in govt talks

aktuálně.cz |
7 June 2010

Although ODS', TOP 09's and VV's programs agree with fiscal austerity, they diverge on a number of issues.

Havel expects tough coalition talks

Earthtimes/DPA |
4 June 2010

Former Czech president Václav Havel said on Thursday he expected complicated talks among the three political parties that are trying to form the Czech Republic's new centre-right government. "The post-election talks have so far proceeded smoothly and soon arrived at a probable coalition," Havel told the German Press Agency dpa. "I doubt that they will continue in a smooth manner. I would expect greater complications."

Czech parties agree centre-right majority coalition

AFP |
3 June 2010

Three Czech parties that won a majority in parliament at weekend elections agreed on a centre-right coalition focused on austerity Wednesday as the president looked poised to name a prime minister. The right-wing Civic Democrats (ODS) and TOP 09 and centrist Public Affairs, who together have a solid 118-seat majority in the 200-seat parliament, penned their deal after four days of talks.

Physicist to become next Czech Prime Minister

European Jewish Press/AFP |
2 June 2010

Petr Nečas looked set Monday to be the Czech Republic's man of the moment, a trained physicist to implement austerity measures as the country tries to recover from economic and political crises.

Centre-right coalition talks proving far from easy

Radio Prague |
2 June 2010

Following the weekend general elections, Czech right-wing parties are scrambling to capitalise on their gains and reach agreement on a coalition government of fiscal responsibility. Although there is general agreement on the direction the country should take, Monday's talks indicated that creating a centre-right coalition will be far from easy.

Public Affairs party remains a mystery to many

Radio Prague |
1 June 2010

Aside from the Public Affairs party's self-proclaimed role of watchdog, the party's background and ambitions remain unclear even to its potential coalition partners.

Czech centre-right in coalition talks

Financial Times |
31 May 2010

Centre-right parties in the Czech Republic yesterday began negotiations over forming a coalition government after an unexpectedly strong result in parliamentary elections that ended on Saturday.

Budget-cutting coalition government seen in ČR

The Wall Street Journal |
31 May 2010

Czech general elections over the weekend gave a 118-seat majority in the country's 200-seat lower house of Parliament to a group of three center-right parties, and after years of political instability the Czechs will most likely have a solid government that is ready to deal with big issues. The fiscally-minded government is expected to get instill confidence in markets and remove any pre-election concerns that the Czech Republic’s sovereign rating could be downgraded.

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