Brno, Feb 1 (CTK) – The Archives of the Town of Brno has released the latest book describing Brno in the mid-20th century based on the recollections of the Brno Germans who were transferred from the town after World War Two, Jana Noskova, from the Czech Institute of Ethnology which published it, said on Wednesday.

The interest in such publications is growing, also because the topic of Brno Germans was taboo before 1989, Noskova said.

In addition, the number of eye-witnesses of the war and postwar events has been falling, which also plays a role, she added.

“A search for the roots is another impulse. This is an affair that also reached the Czech Republic after 1989. People have not only started looking for their own roots, but they are also interested in the history of the places in which they live,” Noskova said.

A role is played by nostalgia and the popularity of similar books is connected with the generational exchange, she added.

“Coming to terms with problematic history mostly starts at the moment of the arrival of a new generation that is no longer identical with the generation of culprits,” Noskova said.

In the book, the readers find the recollections of the Germans who were enlisted by the Wehrmacht or were Hitlerjugend members, Noskova said.

The book is launched in both Czech and German, she added.

“There is an emphasis on pluralism, various views and the trend of diverting from a clear-cut focus on political history, with a preference of the history of day-to-day life,” Noskova said.

She said she had started collecting the materials for the book in 2010 and wanted to continue with it.

The book includes diaries, biographies and autobiographies.

This year, Brno will host the second festival Meeting Brno. Last year, it was held for the first time, following up the project Reconciliation Year with which Brno commemorated the end of World War Two in 2015 in the broadest context, including the victims of Nazi dictatorship and postwar violence.

This year, it will start on May 19. There will be tens of descendants of the three most prominent Jewish industrialists who helped build the town, the Tugendhat, Loew-Beer and Stiassny families.