Prague, Feb 1 (CTK) – The people living in the Czech Republic’s regions in which poverty threatens many also have on average a shorter life expectancy, daily Pravo wrote on Wednesday, citing the figures of the Czech Institute of Health Information and Statistics (UZIS).

Despite noise, the stress and smog, the residents of Prague have an average the longest life span. At the same time, they have the highest incomes from the whole country, Pravo writes.

In 2015, the average gross salary was 33,852 crowns a month in Prague.

The shortest life expectancy is on average in the regions in the western and eastern parts of the Czech Republic, Pravo writes.

In them, the salaries are also deep below the national average.

In the Karlovy Vary Region, the average gross salary was 22,750 crowns in 2015, while the national average was 26,467 crowns.

In Prague, the life expectancy was 77.7 and 82.6 years for men and women, respectively, in 2014-2015, Pravo writes.

“Compared with the national average, men in Prague live 1.9 years longer and women 1.2 years longer,” the data from the latest edition of the UZIS yearbook say.

“The worst mortality conditions have been in the Usti, Moravia-Silesia and Karlovy Vary regions in the long run,” the yearbook says.

In 2014-2015, the shortest life expectancy for both sexes was in the Usti Region. It reached 73.9 years for men and 79.6 years for women.

In other words, men live on average almost four years fewer and women three years fewer in northern Bohemia than the residents of Prague, Pravo writes.

A survey conducted by the Median polling agency has confirmed that people from northwestern Bohemia and Moravia-Silesia suffer from material deprivation much more than the rest, it adds.

Median analyst Daniel Prokop said material deprivation afflicted 13.5 percent and 12 percent of households in the two regions, while the national average is just under 7 percent.

In Prague, it only affects 6 percent of the population.

In addition, the two regions also have the record number of bankruptcies and debtors per 1,000 population, Pravo writes.