Prague, Aug 22 (CTK) – A Czech student wore niqab and was going to mosques in Germany for two years in order to gain information about radical Muslims for the German intelligence, daily Mlada fronta Dnes (MfD) writes on Monday.

The 24-year-old woman created a list of 52 Muslims who were the most radical, including their names, phone numbers, addresses and e-mail contacts, the paper writes.

When she arrived in Berlin, she wanted to get acquainted with the Salafi fundamental version of Islam, although she is a Christian. She decided to go to the Al Nur mosque in which hatred of unbelievers was preached according to German media.

In the Al Nur mosque, she addressed girls in niqab, the full-faced veil, and told them she was interested in Islam.

“All were mistrustful of me at first, suspecting that I am a journalist, but as soon as I said I would like to convert, their mistrust disappeared. I was afraid, of course,” she told the paper.

After several weeks of going to prayers and to the Quran school she formally converted. As she believed that some imams and other Muslims praised Jihadism, she contacted the secret service.

“For example, Aziza from Algeria who taught the Quran was among the most radical. She defended armed jihad, hated democracy. Nobody condemned it there,” she said.

The German counter-intelligence provided the student with an audio recording device, a special cell phone and two of its officers had regular secret meetings with her.

The German counter-intelligence BfV writes in its latest annual report that it had dozens of informants from the Muslim environment. According to its data, the number of German radical Islamic Salafists increased to 7000 and more than 1000 of them were ready to commit terrorist violence.

After one year, the Czech student moved from Berlin to Munich where she continued to go to a mosque and cooperate with the BfV. The Muslim community repeatedly tried to find a husband for her, the last one of whom was a jihadist who probably went to fight in Syria for Islamic State, but she always managed to reject the offer, saying she still felt too young or that she wanted to marry a Muslim in her homeland.

In Germany, she learnt Arabic, made pictures of the mosques, maps of their interiors and audio recordings of the lectures.

At present, back in the Czech Republic again, she is hunting for people who recruit for the Islamic State terrorist organisation on the Internet and she decided to focus on security studies, MfD writes.

“People are connected by their faith in the mosque and it is a venue for social contacts and getting to know others. These contacts are then maintained through the social networking sites,” she told the paper, adding that she mostly operates on Facebook and various discussion forums.