Many expected the families living in the southern Moravian villages, that were struck by June’s tornado, to end up in massive debt. However, it seems like the contrary is true. Initial estimates expected 300 families to end up in such debt, that a seizure of property would be required. However, new field research performed by the non-profit organization People in Need shows that out of about 1000 affected families merely 20 families face such a fate after the natural catastrophe. These families cannot receive any financial aid from the government and from non-profits,  since they would instantly lose it to the debt collectors. On the other hand, they can be offered consultations on how to deal with their debt and receive other ways. Many are now surprised that just 20 families are facing seizure of property after such a large disaster. An expert from People in Need, Daniel Hůle, explained: “People in foreclosures usually do not own a house and usually live in leased property. That is one of the reasons why the share of people in execution among the affected individuals is so low. ” The location struck by the tornado was mostly made up of family houses, which tend to belong to those who live in them in this part of the Czech Republic. Those who cannot afford to build their own home usually rent a flat, not a home. There have been many flats constructed in the Czech Republic during the communist era, so it still remains common to see them even in smaller towns. Since only owners of properties can be affected by their destruction, and basic insurance covered damage caused by tornados, only a small minority of people are in foreclosure. It is likely those who built a house and did not insure it.